• Popular Recommendations

  • PEER
  • ultrasound
  • LLSA
  • sepsis

Change in Insurance Rates

statebutton1 statebutton2 statebutton3 statebutton4
statebutton5 statebutton7 statebutton8 statebutton9


Alabama AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
Alaska News reports on an increase in rates charged by GE Medical Protective of between 16 and 92 percent in 2004. The primary market medical liability carrier was forced to raise premiums 12.5% in 2003, following a 278% premium increase in 2000.
Arizona News reports on an increase in rates charged by GE Medical Protective of between 16 and 92 percent in 2004. The primary market medical liability carrier was forced to raise premiums 12.5% in 2003, following a 278% premium increase in 2000.
Arkansas AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004. The state insurance dept. reported 9 insurers increased their base premium rates in 2003 and 3 increased their rates in 2004.
California AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
Colorado Coic Insurance, the state's largest insurer, said it would raise premiums in 2006 by 2.9%, the smallest increase in four years. In 2005, Copic raised rates by an average of 15.9% to $15,500. Copic attributed the smaller increase in 2006 to the enacatment of damage caps in 2003. Copic provids coverage for about 80% of state's physicians. The AMA repors at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004.
Connecticut CMIC, a physician-owned insurer, announced it would not increase rates in 2006 and physicians with no liabiality losses who have been insured by CMIC for at least 5 years will receive credits of 7.5% to 25% off their premiums. State regulators denied a request by ProMutual to increase premiums by 12%. ProMutual increased rates by 23.2% in November 2004. In October 2004, 3 insurers requested rate increases of 14.6%, 25% and 89.6% respectively.
Delaware AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004.
Florida An FSU College of Medicine survey of rural physicians revealed an average increase in premiums of 93.5% in 2004. GE Medical Protective raised rates 45% in 2004. Medical Protective reduced premiums by an average of 8.7% in 2005. FPIC, the state's largest liability insurer, said it would hold rates steady in 2006. In 2010, the Office of Insurance Regulation reported that avg. premiums fell 10.8% in 2009.  In 2011, the Office of Insurance Reg. reports that from 2004-2009  total premiums dropped form $860M to $550M. But average premiums were $42K for primary care physicians and $171K for specialists.
Georgia Mag Mutual reports that rates rose 30.1% in 2003 and 9.9% in 2004.  After reforms were implemented, rates dropped 10.1% in 2001, 4.7% in 2011 and 2.1% in 2012.
Hawaii The state medical society reports that premiums for OB/GYNs increased by 53% between 2000 and 2005 and orthopedic surgeons have seen a 45% increase since 2001.
Idaho AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004.
Illinois In April 2005, ISMIE Mutual, which provides coverage for about 60% of the physicians in the state, announced plans to freeze premiums. News reports stated that premium notices received by phsyicians indicate likely increases of 30 to 50% in 2005.  The AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates more than 100% in 2004. ISMIE announced in early 2006  that it will reduce rates by an average of 5.2% starting in July 2006, but some practices saw increases of up to 25%.  The state department of insurance had ordered ISMIE to cut premiums by at least 3.5% for FY 2006-2007. In the fall of 2007, news reports indicated that premiums had fallen for many physicians from between 5% and more than 30%.
Indiana AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004. In 2004, physicians faced a 72.6% increase in payments to the patient comp. fund. The state insurance fund for physicians who can’t find other insurance planned a 46% rate hike in 2005. (Ind. Business Journal) The patient compensation fund surcharge increased only 3% in 2007, according to the state Department of Insurance, and a 19.1% decrease in physician rates occurred in 2008, the first decrease since the fund's inception in 1975.
Iowa AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004.
Kansas AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
Kentucky AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004. Rate increases in 2002-2003 ranged from an avg. of 64% to more than 200% for some emergency physicians. (AP, Jan. 13, 2004)
Louisiana AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004.
Maine AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004.
Maryland In August 2005, Medical Mutual Liabilty announced that liabilty rates would remain unchanged for the next year. Med Mutual, the state's largest insurer, collected more than $27 million in 2005 from the new 2% tax on HMOs created to help pay for liaiblity coverage. In September 2004, Medical Mutual Liability Insurance raised physician premiums 33%, and their rates had increased by 66.8% since 2003. In November 2003, a Maryland ACEP survey showed emergency physicians in the state experienced an average increase in premiums of about 60 percent in 2003. The Medical Mutual Liability Insurance plans to reduce premium rates for physicians by 8% in 2007, a move that would mark the first reduction since at least 1992.
Massachusetts AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004. There was an 11 percent average increase from the ProMutual Group, the state’s leading commercial insurer in 2004 following a 20% hike in 2003. In 2005, ProMutual announced it would not increase rates for the coming year. Since 1998, rates increased 99 percent compounded. (A.M. Best 2004)
Michigan AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004. The state's largest liability insurer announced an average reduction in rates of 6.5% for 2008 and an average reduction of 13% in Wayne County.
Minnesota AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
Mississippi The Medical Assurance Co. will reduce premiums by 5% in 2006, according to the state insurance commissioner. MACM covers aboaut 70% of physicians in the stae. MACM also reproted it would refund 10% of premiums paid by physicians in 2005 if company finances continue to improve. The AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates more than 100% in 2004. In 2009, the Washington Examiner reported tha tthe state's largest insurer has dropped premiums by 42% and offered 20% rebates on premiums since 2004.
Missouri The state insurance dept. reported that total premiums collected incresed from $210.7 million to $243.4 million in 2004, while incurred losses…claims that have been paid or are expected to be in the future…fell from $189.5 million to $126.6 million. The AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25-40% in 2004. The state dept. of insurance reported that premiums rose by 121% between 2000 and 2003 while payouts to plaintiffs rose only 14%.
Montana AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004. State Medical Society says rates rose from 50% to 100% from 2003-2005.
Nebraska AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
Nevada AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004. Physician owned insurer Nevada Mutual, which covers about half of all physicians in the state reduced rates by an avg. of 2.5% in 2005, but says some OB’s still pay about $140,000 per year. In 2005, Medical Liability Association was granted a 14.8% overall premium increase.
New Hampshire State actuary testified at a Dept. of Insurance hearing in July 2005 that Medical Mutual Insurance had increased liability rates by 80% since January of 1999 with two other insurers raising rates more than 30 percent. AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004.
New Jersey AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004.
New Mexico AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
New York AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004. In 2007, the  state approved a 14% increase in rates to address large insurer deficits. In August 2008,Gov. Paterson enacted a one-year moratorium on rate increases, the New York Post reports. The moratorium, which will last until June 2009, could halt increases of up to 30% according to the state Insurance Department.
North Carolina AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004.
North Dakota AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004.
Ohio AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004.  The Ohio Medical Malpractice Commission reported that the five largest insurers increased rates by an average of 30% in 2003, with much larger increases in some regions and within certain specialties including emergency medicine. After additional rate hikes in 2004 and 2005, four of the state's five largest medical malpractice insurers revised their rates to produce an average decrease of almost 2 percent for Ohio doctors in 2006, according to the Department of Insurance. The 1.7 percent decrease in rates follows an average increase of 6.7 percent in 2005, and hikes of 20 percent in 2004 and 30 percent in each of the two previous years.
Oklahoma AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates more than 100% in 2004. In March 2004, Physicians Liability Insurance Co., a subsidiary of the Oklahoma State Medical Association, asked the state insurance commissioner to approve a 50% increase in premiums, a year after an 82.8% hike to be implemented over three years was approved.
Oregon AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004. Northwest Physicians Mutual reports Obs and neurosurgeons paid $21,895 and $23,563 in 1999 and $72,112 and $70,386 in 2003.
Pennsylvania PMSLIC, the largest carrier in the state, announced that t  would not be a premium increase in 2006, after five years of double-digit increases. PMSLIC imposed an increase of 40% in 2002 and 54% in 2003. A Price Waterhouse Coopers study in 2005 reports liability rates dropping from 5 to 8 percent. AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004. The October 2005 newsletter of the Medical Liability Monitor said that Pennsylvania physicians pay some of the highest malpractice insurance premiums in the nation. In April 2009, the Administrative Office of PA Courts reported that insurance premiums have decreased or stayed the same during the last three years.
Rhode Island AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
South Carolina AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004. After reforms passed in 2005, JUA and the Patient Compensation Fund announced plans to raise rates by 22%. Rates for some high-risk specialties are expected to exceed $75,000. SCJUA has raised rates for emergency physicians every year from 2003-2007. Respectively, those annual increases have been 28.7%, 32.2%, 12.7%, 7.2% and 15.1% (Source: Wachovia Insurance Services)
South Dakota AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates from 40 to 100% in 2004.
Tennessee AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 25 to 40% in 2004.
Texas TMLT cut rates by 12% after reform enactment, and reduced rates again by 5% in 05 and 06.  APIE announced a 13% rate cut in August of 05 after a 5% cut 6 months earlier.  Doctors Company announced a 9 to 14% cut effective May of 05. JUA cut rates by 10% in 05.  In 05,  TMA reported every carrier had cut rates since reform, saving doctors $50M in premiums.  TMLT rate trends available at http://www.texmed.org/Template.aspx?id=3868  The NY Times reported in October 2007 that average rates fell 21.3% since reforms. In July 2009, Medicus announced an 11% rate cut in its 3rd year in TX, including large cuts for emergency medicine.
Utah AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
Vermont AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
Virginia AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004.
Washington The state office of the insurance commissioner reported that physicians' insurance premiums, when adjusted for inflation, cots about the same in 2005 as it did in 1985. Physicians Insurance asked to reduce premium rates by 7.7% in 2005, after the company reported record earnings in 2004. The Doctors Company announced avg premium reductions of 7.2% for 2008. AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004. Avg. premiums have increased 15 o 25 percent per year for several years.
West Virginia AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 0 to 25% in 2004. In September of 2004, insurer NCRIC asked the state to approve a 9.5% rate increase in addition to the 9.8% increase approved December 2003. West Virginia Physicians Mutual, the largest insurer in the state,  applied for an average 15% rate reduction in Oct. of 2006.
Wisconsin AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004.
Wyoming AMA reports at least one insurer raised rates as much as 40 to 100% in 2004. an obstetrician in Wyoming who has never been sued pays about $87,000 a year for insurance with The Doctors Company. A physician in the same specialty in South Dakota pays the company just under $29,000. Rates for a general practice physician in Wyoming who does not provide surgery or hospital care are about $15,300. The same doctor might pay about $6,700 per year in Idaho.
LIVE CHAT
[ Feedback → ]